Little Goat Food & Drink

little_goat01 (2)

So we did it. We have opened little goat. We took possession of the space at 2615 portage avenue on Thursday, November 24 and we opened for breakfast on Tuesday, December 4th. It’s still a work in progress, probably always will be, we still have chairs to build, bookshelves to assemble and stock, walls to paint and people to hire, but we opened our sunny front room and started serving on Tuesday morning.key

building

Some of you might be asking, “weren’t you going to be in Osborne Village?” Well, that was the plan, but things don’t always work out how you expect they will. Some of you know what happened, the rest will have to use their imagination. I was always taught, “If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say it at all.”  Anyway,  when things fell apart, we went looking a new place. Our two criteria were that it had to be already set up as a restaurant and it had to be in a vibrant neighbourhood. This is when we came across this building in Sunny St. James. I didn’t really realize that there are lots of people living down here. And they are really nice people! So we found this little spot, made a deal, and then spent 10 days of ridiculously long hours to get it ready to open. This is the first time we have ever set an opening date for a spot, and actually opened on that date.

People have asked, “are you doing a soft opening?”. Sort of, not really. We are solidly open. However, we are opening one meal service at a time in the chronological order of the meals in your day.  First, this week, we are open for breakfast. Next week, we will open for lunch. We are still waiting for our liquor licence, and at this late date we probably won’t get it before Christmas, so we expect we will open for dinner early in the new year. We are open Tuesday to Saturday, this week from 8 to 11, next week from 8 to 3. We will have a website soon, it will be at http://www.littlegoat.ca (Don’t go look yet, it’s still being developed)

bell

Our phone number, if you want to talk to us in person is 204-254-GOAT (4628)

Here is a look at our opening menu, hope to see you here soon, we are ready and eager to serve!

LG Breakfast 4 PDF

 

People have asked, “are you still doing catering?”

Yes!

One of the reasons we fell in love with this space, is that there is plenty of room to prep for catering events. For example, we are catering 3 office parties  this weekend and a First Night of Chanukah event next week.

For catering, please contact us at catering@alexanderskitchen.ca

 

We are hiring for all positions. If you are interested in being a part of a workplace that celebrates diversity, creativity and genuine hospitality, please email a resume to chef@alexanderskitchen.ca or just drop in to 2615 Portage Ave.

 

Holiday Entertaining? Let us help!

holiday hearthThe holiday season is just around the corner, need a hand? We can cater your holiday dinners, office Christmas parties and family gatherings. Do you just need a hand prepping a few apps? We can do that! Need full service catering with servers and bartenders? We can do that too. Food for 6 or 60 (or even 600!) we can accommodate. We like to make custom menus for our clients so please contact us at catering@alexanderskitchen.ca and let us help you.

We can also do some great holiday baking for you. Let us bake some festive cookies and dainties or make some showstopper desserts like our dark chocolate, sour cherry trifle! One of my favourite things to make is a traditional Buche de Noel, complete with little meringue mushrooms. Just let us know what you need!

Here are a couple sample menus for you:

Pass Around Appetizers
$9/person

roasted squash, sesame, shiitake mushroom

brie with fig and pistachio

brie, fig and pistachio crostini

baby bocconcini, cherry tomato and basil skewers

 

Main Course, Buffet Style
$34/person

roast pork loin stuffed with apricots, sundried cranberries and apples with a dijon mustard glaze

baked salmon with sundried tomatoes, italian parsley and olive oil

oven roasted potatoes with rosemary and garlic

wild rice with mushrooms and parmesan

roasted beets and carrots with sunflower seeds and scallions

brussel sprouts with bacon and cream

field greens with currants, feta and walnuts in a balsamic vinaigrette

romaine lettuce with artichoke, red onion and avocado in lime, cilantro dressing

Dessert

assorted dainties and cookies

Menu #2

Pass Around Apps
$11/person

berber spiced shrimp with mint and lemongrilled shrimp

savoury profiteroles with chicken liver mousse and cornichon

roast garlic and white bean tapenade with eggplant relish

Main Course, Buffet Style
$40/person

Brown sugar and smoked paprika crusted beef tenderloin with chimichurri

Chicken fricasee with leeks and mushrooms

sweet and savoury potato dauphinoise

saffron pilaf with sundried cranberries, raisins and toasted pine nuts

green beans with pancetta and parmesan

roasted cauliflower with coriander, orange and chilies

roasted root vegetables with sage and brown butter

Butter lettuce with fennel and grapefruit in a mint and ginger dressing

arugula salad with roasted pear, blue cheese and walnuts in a red wine vinaigrette

Dessert

banana, chocolate chip bread pudding with warm caramel sauce

 

Boeuf Bourguignon

beef fryingThis recipe is ripped right out of the pages of Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French CookingBut that’s not where I learnt it. This is a dish from my childhood. It’s funny how the hings you grow up seem normal. It wasn’t until I was an adult that I realized that most kids in Canada didn’t have this dish

beef searedas a regular staple in their diets. I grew up watching Julia Child on PBS with my mom. I love making this dish, not just because it encourages you to speak in Julia’s high-pitched voice, but because it is a simple beef stew, elevated by technique. Don’t try to skip steps, don’t over fill your pan, don’t cheat. The end result is worth the extra work.

 

Boeuf Bourguignon

beef raw2 lbs beef

ok, lets talk about beef. What cut I use depends on how much time I have. If you need this made in a hurry and still want it to taste awesome, use tenderloin. You can brown it, make the saucy part and serve it medium rare. If you have a couple hours, use sirloin. Makes a nice braise, but doesnt need a ton of time. But for the best tasting, with the richest sauce use something from the shoulder. You can use cross rib, top blade or even chuck shortribs.

1/2 lb baconbacon

1 lb mushrooms, halved, quartered or whole

1/2 lb baby onions, shallots or cipollini

or if you can’t find any of those, just coarse chop regular onions

1 clove garlic, smashed

2 cups full bodied red wine

2 cups beef stock

2 bay leaves

1 sprig rosemary

salt and pepper to taste

cornstarch

  1. dice beef into 1 1/2 inch cubes. season with salt and pepper
  2. cut bacon into 1/2 inch lardons, peel onions (or shallots)shallots
  3. in a heavy dutch oven, fry bacon until a healthy amount of bacon fat has been rendered. remove bacon from pot and set aside, pour off excess fat, but save the fat.
  4. working in batches so you don’t crowd the pot. brown beef on all sides. set aside
  5. mushroomsreturn a little bacon fat to the pot. again working in batches, sautee the mushrooms. set aside
  6. add a little more bacon fat and sautee the onions. deglaze the pan with red wine. add bay leaf and rosemary and bring to a boil. reduce until 1/2 cup of wine remains.
  7. return beef, mushrooms and bacon to pot. Add stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and braise until meat is fork tender.bacon and mushrooms
  8. if the sauce is thin, make a slurry with the cornstarch and mix into the sauce. bring back to a boil to thicken
  9. check seasoning. (trick: if the sauce tastes a little flat you can add a tbsp soy sauce. If it tastes too acidic, add a little brown sugar. If it tastes too sweet, add a tsp vinegar.)
  10. Bouef BourguignonBe sure to wish your dinner guests a resounding “Bon Appetit!!”

Cooking Classes

Chef Alex will be teaching cooking classes on Wednesday October 11 and Wednesday October 25. Each class will begin at 7:00 and run for roughly 3 hours. In each class will include a three course dinner. Each class will combine demonstration with a hands on component. You will learn some basic skills, some new recipes and some “chef tricks”. You will leave each class with a handout of all the recipes you created. These classes are meant to be educational, but more than that, they are meant to be fun!

Classes are $75.00 per person, or you can book for both classes for $130.00.

Wednesday October 11th: Cooking Italian

pasta picTortellini di zucca with brown butter and sage

Chicken Scallopini with white wine, herbs and capers served with rapini, cherry tomato salsa fresca and soft polenta

Red Wine poached pears with candied walnuts and zabaglione

 

choc souffle

Wednesday October 25th: French Cuisine

Profiteroles stuffed with chicken liver mousse

Boeuf Bourguignon with creamy mashed potatoes and green beans.

Chocolate Grand Marnier Souffle

email me at chef@alexanderskitchen.ca to sign up. I am keeping these classes small, so book soon.

Thanksgiving is just around the corner, need a hand?

turkeyIt seems like this year  Thanksgiving Weekend kind of snuck up on us. Wasn’t it just last week that we were sitting on the beach? If you are feeling stressed about having to serve your family and friends an elaborate feast this weekend, let us help you.

We can Brine and Stuff the bird, we can make all the side dishes, we can even do the whole thing, complete with appetizers and desserts. If you are interested in doing a theme, talk to us, we can tweak the menu to suit you.

Just the Turkey

     Brined, seasoned and stuffed. Ready to roast                                    $8/person (min 8 ppl)

     Roasted and Ready to serve, delivered hot.                                                           $15/person

      for a free run bird,                                                                                               add $5/person

All the Sides

     mashed potatoes, baked yams, 3 veggie dishes, cranberry sauce, pickles, gravy and a salad                                                                      $12/person (min 8 ppl)

Dessert

     Pumpkin Pie, Apple Pie and Chocolate Brownies                             $8/person (min 8 ppl)

Appetizers

     mini crab and corn cakes, kale and feta galettes,

     blue cheese and bacon stuffed mushrooms                                          $9/person

squashDelivery Charges may apply.

To order, just email us at catering@alexanderskitchen.ca

Easy Chicken Curry Dinner in 4 Parts

curry pic 1Okay, maybe doing any dinner that involves 4 parts can’t really be called “easy”. But each part is easy and they all stand alone. Serve the curry with the rice and skip the other two. Enjoy the eggplant with a couple poached eggs and some toasted bread. Use the zucchini as a side dish to almost anything. Take the curry, wrap it in a tortilla and call it Roti. There are lots of options. But even if you made the whole 4 part menu, you should be in and out of your kitchen in under an hour.  And there is a reason your stove has 4 elements.

If you have any bottled chutney’s or hot sauces, pull them out of the fridge for this. You can add to this menu by serving it with sliced cucumbers, some nice plain yogurt, some little bowls on nuts and seeds. Part of the fun of Indian cooking is the way you get to play with your food.

chicken curryChicken Curry

2 lbs chicken thighs

1 tbsp canola oil

1 large onion, diced

2 stalks celery, chopped

1 clove garlic, minced

1 tsp ginger, minced

1 tbsp of your favourite curry powder

(pro tip: If you don’t feel like grinding your own curry powder. try mixing two different ones together. For this recipe I used 2 parts madras curry and 2 part hot jamaican)

pinch of chilies, to taste

1 tbsp brown sugar

6 russet potatoes, peeled and diced

2 cups chicken stock

1 cup yogurt

salt and pepper to taste

  1. cut chicken into large chunks. Heat oil in a large skillet or dutch oven. Add chicken to pot. Let chicken begin to brown
  2. add onions, celery, garlic, ginger, spices and sugar. Cook for about 5 minutes on high heat, stirring occasionally.
  3. add potatoes and stock. bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until potatoes are soft and chicken is tender.
  4. Mix in yogurt , check seasoning and serve.

Sweet and Spicy Eggplanteggplant

1 tbsp canola oil

1 large eggplant or a couple small ones, diced

1 large onion, diced

1 tbsp coriander seed

1 tsp (or more) dried chili flakes

2 cups diced tomatoes

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup white vinegar

1/4 cup sesame seeds

1 tbsp sesame oil

salt and pepper to taste

  1. in a dry pan, toast the coriander til it starts to pop.
  2. add oil and sauté onions until translucent. Add chilies and eggplant and sauté until eggplant is tender.
  3. add tomatoes, sugar and vinegar. Bring to a boil.
  4. reduce heat and simmer until “jammy”.
  5. stir in sesame seeds and sesame oil. adjust seasoning. Serve hot with dinner, but any  leftovers will keep well in the refrigerator and can be used as a chutney.

Shredded Zucchinishredded zucchini

4 zucchini, grated on the largest grater size, or julienned on a mandoline.

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp chili powder

1/2 tsp ground cumin

lime

salt and pepper to taste.

  1. working in batches, being careful not to overload the frying pan, sauté the zuchinni.
  2. Sprinkle with chilies, cumin, salt and a squeeze of lime.

riceBasmati Rice

2 cups basmati rice, cleaned

3 1/2 cups water

1 tbsp butter

  1. put all ingredients in sauce pan. cover with lid
  2. bring to a boil.
  3. reduce heat to a simmer and cook until all the liquid is absorbed. About 20 minutes.

Variations

  1. after the rice is cooked, stir in chopped green onion, cilantro and mint
  2. after rice is cooked, stir in raisins and slivered almonds
  3. while rice is cooking, add some orange peel, a couple star anise, a couple whole cloves, and a piece of cinnamon stick
  4. while cooking, add lemon zest, a slice of ginger and green coriander pods
  5. while cooking add a few threads of saffron
  6. all of the above

Pop Up, September 15th

We are putting on a Pop-Up dinner at Cafe 1958 this Friday, Sept. 15th. Tickets are $60 per person. The seating is limited, so book soon. You can email me at chef@alexanderskitchen.ca for more information.

Everyone wants to see the menu. I don’t understand why! I always like the element of surprise. But for those of you who want to know what you are buying tickets for, here it is. I have a vegetarian option available if desired.

Please keep in mind that then menu may change as I go shopping, If I find some cool stuff, I might just have to include it.

Sept 15 Pop Up

Omnivore

pop up menuoysters, cucumber, gin

oxtail broth, red cabbage, raw beef

fried “spam”, quail egg, celery salad

duck with bigoli

grapefruit curd, mint granita, pomegranate

scallops, popcorn grits, cider gastrique, prosciutto

fried kale, mushrooms, chicken fried brie, pickled melon

pork neck, gnocchi, crispy onions, brown butter

strawberry milk, burnt almond cookie, dark chocolate ganache

Herbivore

cucumber salad, fresh mint, pistachios

shitake mushroom broth, klimps, pickled beet

fried tofu, quail egg, celery salad

bigoli with brussel sprouts, walnuts and parmesan

grapefruit curd, mint granita, pomegranate

grilled artichokes, popcorn grits, cider gastrique, roasted fennel

fried kale, mushrooms, chicken fried brie, pickled melon

bigoli with brussel sprouts, walnuts and parmesan

parsnip gnocchi, roasted squash, white beans, crispy onions

strawberry milk, burnt almond cookie, dark chocolate ganache

Making Lunches

About mid-July this year, our youngest daughter informed us that her friend at school has much better lunches than she does and she thinks maybe her chef Papa needs to step up his game.

food picNow, I’m just going to take a moment to unpack all of this. First of all, our youngest is spectacular at throwing some shade and rarely misses an opportunity to do so. She does this with an impish grin and gets away with it most of the time. Secondly, all our children can and do cook. She is super capable of making her own lunches and has done so. Having said that, Alex really loves to cook for people, this is such an expression of affection for him, that he will always make meals for us. Finally, we homeschooled our kids for varying parts of their educations and now we have 3 in school and so making lunches is something we need to get a handle on!

One of my favourite things to eat for lunch, either at home or at work, and what I’m in fact chowing down on as I write this, is a Big Salad. Remember when Elaine on Seinfeld became obsessed by the Big Salad? That is me. I love veggies and I really love having something I can eat over the course of hours as I do other things and it just gets better as the salad dressing sinks in. There is rarely a time in our house when we can’t make a Big Salad out of the stuff in our fridge and cupboards. And to go along with a Big Salad, I like to have a homemade dressing. I really, really, really dislike store bought salad dressings. I find them oddly sweet and glompy. And so I always make my own dressings, which can be as simple as taking some olive oil with salt and pepper in it, and a couple of lemon wedges or as fancy as sesame oil with garlic, ginger, hot chili flakes, soya sauce and lime juice. Check out some of our Big Salad and dressing combinations here.

Now on to those pesky kids! None of our kids are big sandwich eaters. Generally speaking, they will choose other options. And when we were homeschooling all of them, lunch was usually leftovers from the night before. Or pita pizzas: easy and quick. Now, we are looking to make lunches every day and apparently, one of our kid’s friends has a mom who is acing this lunch thing and putting the chef to shame so let’s get this lunch thing kicked up a notch. This will be an on-going endeavour so we’ll be sharing our ideas (and would love to hear yours!) as we go!

How to Build a Big Salad

big salad1 Start with greens

I like to use at least two types of greens.
Use iceberg or romaine for crunch and then
arugula or spinach or mesclun or mizuna or kale or some other more serious green for flavour.

if you are feeling fancy, make Macerated Kale. It breaks it down and makes it tastier and easier to chew.

To make, slice kale into thin strips. (Chiffonade as we chefs call it). Season with salt and pepper, a squeeze of lemon and a massage in a little olive oil.

Or season with soy sauce and dried chilies, a splash of rice vinegar and massage in sesame oil. adding toasted sesame seeds is nice too.

Or add a little protein. Massage in some tahini and lemon, or peanut butter, or almond butter….

2 Add Veggies, add any or all of the following, whatever you have in your fridge

tomatoes, diced, wedged, cherry tomatoes….
cucumbers, sliced or diced
canned corn
celery, chopped
cabbage, shredded
carrots sliced thin or shredded
broccoli or cauliflower (roasted if you have time)
cooked green beans
red onion, I like to soak in cold water for a bit to take the edge off
snap peas
beets, boiled or roasted
… you get the idea. veggies

3 Add protein, one or more of the following

grilled, sliced chicken breast
grilled, sliced steak
dice ham or salami
hard boiled egg, wedged or chopped
cottage cheese
cheddar, gouda, smoked cheese… any hard cheese
blue cheese, particularly good with arugula and grilled steak
feta, goat cheese or parmesan
4Add something crunchy and interesting

sunflower seeds
walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts… any nut
sesame seeds, hemp seeds, chia seeds
croutons
tortilla chips, corn chips…
coarsely chopped herbs
raisins, currants, dried cranberries

Dress your  salad

can be as simple as a drizzle of olive oil and a squeeze of lemon or a splash of balsamic or use one of these simple dressings:

 

Dijon and Honey

1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp grainy dijon mustard
pinch of salt
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
3 tbsps olive oil

Sesasme Ginger

small clove of garlic, minced
½ tsp grated fresh ginger
pinch of chili flakes
1 tsp brown sugar
1 tbsp rice vinegar (or lime juice)
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sesame oil
2 tbsps canola oil
1 tbsps sesame seeds (optional)

Orange Coriander

1 tsps cracked coriander seeds
1 tsp chili flakes
zest and juice of one orange
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
3 tbsps olive oil

Yogurt Dill

1 tbsp chopped fresh dill
1 tbsp chopped parsley
pinch of cayenne
½ cup yogurt
½ cup mayonaise
1 tbsp lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste

Some of the combinations will work better than others, but play around, you’ll find the ones you like the best.

Mothershuckers!


lianeEvery year we celebrate my girlfriend Liane’s birthday with her. Her birthday is in July so we are lucky enough to have a fun event at the lake. It’s always a beautiful evening of food and wine, celebrating a beautiful soul. Earlier this year, Liane took a holiday to Nova Scotia and enjoyed seafood and beer in a pretty fabulous sounding restaurant on a pier called The Half Shell. This adventure provided the nudge toward a birthday dinner theme for this year: Oysters!

I was slow to come to raw oysters. Throughout my childhood, my dad kept cans of smoked oysters in the cupboard. I was always repulsed by the look of them and slightly put off by the texture of them but I could not resist their salty oiliness. I would eat them on crackers with a little crumble of blue cheese. And then when I was 12, I had an oyster po’boy at a roadside shack along the Gulf of Mexico, somewhere between New Orleans and on route to Florida. I can still remember the big white roll slathered in mayo, crispy cold shreds of iceberg lettuce and the crunch of the breadcrumb coating on the oysters, followed by the surprise of the warm creaminess of the hot oysters. It was incredible. I’ve never had another po’boy that meets up to that experience.

So, canned oysters and hot, breaded oysters were okay by me but raw oysters? Um, nope. Then about 10 years ago, Alex and I visited an oyster restaurant in Toronto called Starfish and I felt the time had come to really take the plunge, quit nibbling around the edges. The incredibly knowledgeable owner/head shucker hooked us up with oysters from all over the place: ….. There were delicate little oyster, meaty, creamy oysters, and mammoth I-think-not-Alex-can-have-those oysters. They were served with lemons and horseradish, and hot sauce, and champagne mignonettes. The owner walked us through pairing up and taught us the history and harvesting practices of most of them. He shucked them quickly and deftly with shuckers he designed and had made for himself. It was a beautiful evening and I left a raw oyster convert.oyster 3

A couple of years later, we took a fun weekend to New York and one of the great highlights was a place called Maison Premiere in Brooklyn. It was ah-mazing. The whole place was done up to look like a New Orleans bar from the turn of the last century, with big, slow moving fans, rickety little tables and peeling wallpaper. Our trays of oysters came on tin plates with shaved ice and we drank cocktails and slurped the oysters all back while listening to live brass band. That was a pretty incredible experience and I truly believe experiences enhance and filter our food experiences.

Possibly my favourite oyster experience came a few years ago in Nova Scotia. Alex and I, along with Adam Connelly from Segovia, attended the Chefs’ Congress run by Chef Michael Statdlander (a dream of mine is to bring this conference to Winnipeg but that is blog for another day…) We were set up in a field next to the Bay of Fundy and during the day, we attended workshops held under open-sided white tents. At the mid-morning break, instead of the usual stale muffins and coffee, Chef Michael Smith set up a giant old wooden cutting board piled with buckets of oysters on ice and shuckers standing upright, having been stabbed into the board. We walked up, grabbed an oyster, shucked it yourself and slurped it back. Followed by a shot of PEI vodka for anyone interested. It was the best conference I’ve ever attended and those were the freshest oysters I’ve ever tasted, having been plucked from the waters the day before. It was a magical experience.


lianaWhen Liane said she wanted oysters for her birthday, we were happy to make that happen. Alex sourced 2 kinds of oysters, malpeques and village bays. He then set about making mignonettes to highlight certain qualities in the oysters (I’ll let him talk about that and share some of the recipes). On the night of the party, we had chilled bottles of bubbly which goes great with oysters. Prosecco, Cava and, of course, Champagne all pair beautifully and cover a wide range of price points. Prosecco (Italy) and Cava (Spain) are both at the lower end of the spectrum, with many lovely bottles available for under $20. As for Champagne, the range is vast. My favourite is Veuve Cliquot and it is about $80-100 a bottle at the MLCC right now.

One of the really cool things that happened at Liane’s birthday party was the spontaneous shucking class Alex led. There were a few people at the event who had never shucked and so he taught them. It’s a great skill to have and once you get going, not too hard to pull off. Our eldest daughter learned how to shuck when she was 15 and got pretty fast at it, turning out plates of dozens of oysters at our old restaurant. There is this sweet spot, and when find it with the shucker, it gives to most satisfying pop and then the whole oyster opens up. You have to scrape under the oyster and do a quick once-over for shell bits, then pop it on the ice tray and grab another one. I highly recommend a shucking party, it’s a good time for everyone. 

About Oysters

oyster1There is a huge variety of oyster types, but the all come from one of 5 edible oyster species. They usually get their names from where they are from, Malpeque, Raspberry Point, Chesapeake Bay etc…. Sometimes they are given cute names that describe their appearance. Lucky limes are called that because of the green colour of their shells. The wide range of flavours come from the characteristics of the water where they were harvested. In general, the colder the water the cleaner the flavour and the smaller the meat. Oysters harvested in warmer waters tend to have a more pronounced “fishy” taste and tend to be larger. I had some Chesapeake Bay oysters in Baltimore that were as large as my fist. Its fun to try a variety of types and enjoy the nuanced tastes.

Oysters once harvested have long shelf life. If you ever have chance to look at old cookbooks from the prairies, you will see lots of recipes that contain oysters. This is because they were one of the few types of seafood that could be shipped this far inland before the advent of refrigerated transportation. When buying oysters, make sure they are fully closed and feel heavy for their size. They should smell like the sea, not like a dead fish lying on the beach.

To shuck an oyster you need an oyster knife. This is a short blunt knife. Although you can buy fancy ones like the Henckell’s or even Paddy’s own design, I am partial to the simple wood handled ones available for about 7 bucks at Gimli Fish Market. You can even do like a lot of the old maritimers do and use a stubby slot screwdriver. You will also need a tea towel, folded 3 times, this is used to hold the oyster and protect your fingers.

To shuck and oyster

oyster shuckf the oysters feel dirty or gritty, rinse under cold water, use a brush if needed.  Take a look at the oyster. There will be a flat side and a rounded side. You will also notice that the shell comes to a point. Place the oyster on the counter or cutting board with the flat side up and the point facing you oyster knife hand. Using the towel, hold the oyster in place. Do not press down too hard. With your other hand, hold the oyster knife, keep your fingers on the inside of the little guard to protect your fingers from the jagged shells. Gently work the tip of the oyster knife between the shells were it comes to a point. Don’t try to force it, just wiggle it gently. You will feel when you have the knife in properly, it feels like a little pop. Once the blade is in place, turn it, like you are turning a key to open a door. Do not pry it open, just twist the blade. When the shells come apart, run the blade along the top shell, keeping the blade flat against the shell. This will cut the muscle away from the shell. Then run the end of the blade along the inside of the bottom shell to release the meat from the shell. Try not to tear the meat and try to keep as much liquid in the shell as possible. The “liquor” keeps the oyster juicy and tasty. Check the oyster to make sure there are no little fragments of shell on the meat. If the oyster meat is dry or if it smells overly fishy, discard the oyster.

oyster 2To eat the oyster, just tip the shell into your mouth and slurp it back. For novice oyster eaters, just swallow the oyster whole like you are doing a tequila shot. Once you have learnt to love the taste of oysters, give the meat a little chew before swallowing it to get more of a flavour experience. I like oysters completely unadorned, but they are also good with a squeeze of lemon or lime, a couple drops of hot sauce or some freshly grated horseradish. Traditionally, oysters are served with a mignonette, which  really just mean something small. The most traditional mignonette is just finely diced shallots with red wine vinegar. I like to play around with other versions. Here are a few to try:

Cucumber Mint Mignonette

1/2 cup finely diced cucumber

1 tbsp chopped mint

1 oz gin

squeeze of lime

Balsamic Tomato Mignonette

peel and seed a roma tomato, finely dice the flesh

1 tbsp finely chopped basil

1 tbsp finely choppep parsley

1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

Radish, Orange, Jalepeno Mignoette

2 radishes, finely diced

1 jalepeno, seeded and finely diced

1 tbsp grated orange zest

1 tbsp orange juice

1/4 cup white wine vinegar

Sesame Ginger Mignonette

1 tbsp grated ginger

1 tbsp black sesame seeds

1 tbsp finely chopped green onion

1 tsp white sugar

1/4 cup rice vinegar

1/4 cup sesame oil